To outlet online sale Wake the Giant: A Novel new arrival of Pearl Harbor online

To outlet online sale Wake the Giant: A Novel new arrival of Pearl Harbor online

To outlet online sale Wake the Giant: A Novel new arrival of Pearl Harbor online

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Product Description

The New York Times bestselling master of military historical fiction tells the story of Pearl Harbor as only he can in the first novel of a gripping new series set in World War II’s Pacific theater.

In 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt watches uneasily as the world heads rapidly down a dangerous path. The Japanese have waged an aggressive campaign against China, and they now begin to expand their ambitions to other parts of Asia. As their expansion efforts grow bolder, their enemies know that Japan’s ultimate goal is total conquest over the region, especially when the Japanese align themselves with Hitler’s Germany and Mussolini’s Italy, who wage their own war of conquest across Europe.

Meanwhile, the British stand nearly alone against Hitler, and there is pressure in Washington to transfer America’s powerful fleet of warships from Hawaii to the Atlantic to join the fight against German U-boats that are devastating shipping. But despite deep concerns about weakening the Pacific fleet, no one believes that the main base at Pearl Harbor is under any real threat.

Told through the eyes of widely diverse characters, this story looks at all sides of the drama and puts the reader squarely in the middle. In Washington, Secretary of State Cordell Hull must balance his own concerns between President Roosevelt and the Japanese ambassador, Kichisaburo Nomura, who is little more than a puppet of his own government. In Japan, Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto wins skeptical approval for his outrageous plans in the Pacific, yet he understands more than anyone that an attack on Pearl Harbor will start a war that Japan cannot win. In Hawaii, Commander Joseph Rochefort’s job as an accomplished intelligence officer is to decode radio signals and detect the location of the Japanese fleet, but when the airwaves suddenly go silent, no one has any idea why. And from a small Depression-ravaged town, nineteen-year-old Tommy Biggs sees the Navy as his chance to escape and happily accepts his assignment, every sailor’s dream: the battleship USS Arizona.

With you-are-there immediacy, Shaara opens up the mysteries of just how Japan—a small, deeply militarist nation—could launch one of history’s most devastating surprise attacks. In this story of innocence, heroism, sacrifice, and unfathomable blindness, Shaara’s gift for storytelling uses these familiar wartime themes to shine a light on the personal, the painful, the tragic, and the thrilling—and on a crucial part of history we must never forget.

Review

“An exciting war story . . . [a] deeply researched, nonjudgmental account of Pearl Harbor.”— Kirkus Reviews

“The run-up to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor . . . is depicted in a thrilling you-are-there re-creation. . . . Fans of military fiction will find much to enjoy.”— Publishers Weekly


Praise for Jeff Shaara

“Shaara [is the] master of the war novel.” Chicago Tribune, on The Steel Wave

“Shaara is apparently giving the people what they want—and what they need.” The Wall Street Journal, on The Rising Tide

“[Shaara] writes with considerable sensitivity and skill.”— The Seattle Times, on The Last Full Measure

“Shaara’s historical accuracy is faultless, and he tells a good story.” Historical Novels Review, on A Chain of Thunder

“An outstanding writer.” Huntington News, on A Blaze of Glory

“Whether you’re a military veteran or currently serving in the armed forces, or you’re a history buff or just enjoy a well-told tale, check out Jeff Shaara. Nobody tells war stories any better.” The Sacramento Bee, on The Final Storm

About the Author

Jeff Shaara is the New York Times bestselling author of The Frozen Hours, The Fateful Lightning, The Smoke at Dawn, A Chain of Thunder, A Blaze of Glory, The Final Storm, No Less Than Victory, The Steel Wave, The Rising Tide, To the Last Man, The Glorious Cause, Rise to Rebellion, and Gone for Soldiers, as well as Gods and Generals and The Last Full Measure—two novels that complete the Civil War trilogy that began with his father’s Pulitzer Prize–winning classic, The Killer Angels. Shaara was born into a family of Italian immigrants in New Brunswick, New Jersey. He grew up in Tallahassee, Florida, and graduated from Florida State University. He lives in Newtown Square, Pennsylvania.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

One

Biggs

Palatka, Florida—­Saturday, December 14, 1940

He knew he could hammer the ball when it left Russo’s hand. The stripe of tape spun slowly, a lazy fastball, too lazy, floating toward him like a fat melon. He cocked the bat, then sprung forward, the bat meeting the ball, a hard thump, the ball now speeding away, rising. He began his run to first base, still watching the ball, hearing the shouts from the others, one voice, Clyde, the first baseman, “Holy mackerel. But it ain’t staying fair. Too bad.”

He touched first, curled toward second, his eye on the ball again, a quick turn in his gut. Beside him, Clyde said, “It’s gonna hit your house.”

Biggs watched it drop, a sharp punch through the kitchen window. The others turned to him now, and Russo said, “Holy crap. You busted it to hell. Your folks home? Geez, Tommy, I ain’t seen you hit one that far since high school.”

Biggs looked at Russo. “You never pitched me a fat one like that. I was gonna kill it.”

Russo turned again toward the Biggs house. “You killed it. Too bad it was foul.”

Biggs didn’t care about the game anymore, walked slowly off the field, past third base and the run-­down lean-­to that passed for the dugout. No one called him back, all of them silently grateful it was him and not any one of them.

He didn’t turn back, couldn’t hide the quiver in his voice. “I gotta make sure nobody’s hurt.”

His eyes stayed on the jagged hole punched in the window, and he moved with measured steps, in no rush to meet the wrath that would surely come from his father. At nineteen, Biggs knew there would be no belt, and his father had rarely used fists on his son. But there was anger in the man’s words, the deathly glare from his eyes. No matter how old Biggs might be, his father’s eyes showed a brutal viciousness, punishment enough for any offense.

Even before he graduated high school, Biggs had grown taller than his father, with broader shoulders, stronger arms. As he grew older, not one of his friends doubted that a nineteen-­year-­old with Biggs’s athletic strengths could handle any of his father’s mouthy brutishness. But Biggs knew that no matter the physical difference between them, his father was always to be obeyed. Or feared. His anger would often erupt for no apparent reason, a terrifying viciousness sometimes directed at Biggs’s mother, the man’s sharp voice carrying through the entire neighborhood.

As he grew older, Biggs finally began to understand just why his father seemed so angry. For so many of the men in the small community, the jobs had gone away, the lumber plant nearly shut down, one more casualty of the Depression. Some of those jobs had moved farther west, to another plant out in the Florida Panhandle. Men like Clarence Biggs seemed to live on hope and on pledges from the local politicians of the great efforts they were making to bring in more plants, factories, jobs for all. In every tavern, men repeated the optimism they heard from the newspaper—­that the town would survive, even prosper, that Florida’s celebrated boom of the 1920s would return, and with that, opportunity for all.

But in this neighborhood of ragged homes with clapboard walls, of vacant fields of sand and sandspurs, there was very little to be hopeful about. No matter what the men in the fancy suits promised them, Clarence Biggs had stopped paying attention to what Palatka was trying to be. What was here, now, were broken men. They knew what poor was, their pride as empty as their hope. Like most of them, Clarence had settled for work where he could find it. Every day, he spent long hours at a seafood plant near the St. Johns River. There was nothing elegant about scaling and gutting fish, the pay not enough to buy the fish he cleaned, and the stench he carried home on his clothes reminded them all that Clarence was too weary and too defeated to be embarrassed.

Biggs reached the front door, stood for a long minute, glanced back to the weed-­infested vacant lot that was the ball field. His friends were gathered, watching him, and he waved them away, thought, Just play the damn game. He lowered his head now, let out a breath. No, I guess they can’t do that. The only ball we’ve got is in Mom’s kitchen.

The doorknob was flimsy, barely catching, and he turned it slowly, pushed the door open, heard the familiar squeal. He slipped inside, was surprised to see his father standing, arms crossed, near the opening to the small kitchen. Tommy saw the ball now in the man’s hand, and his father held it out toward him.

“What kind of damned ball is this?”

He knew he was being baited, knew this would go however his father wanted.

“Only ball we got. The masking tape holds it together. Herman’s father had a roll.”

“Herman hit the ball through the kitchen window? Maybe one of those other jerks you play with? Maybe it was Babe Ruth, stopped by to play a couple innings.”

“No. It was me.”

“You? You actually hit the ball out of those weeds?”

“Yeah. Me. I’m sorry, Pop.” He saw his mother, coming slowly out of their bedroom, standing quietly behind her husband. “I’m sorry, Mom. Didn’t mean to bust your window. Hope nobody’s hurt or anything.”

She stared at him, shook her head slowly, a hint of anger in her tired eyes. She motioned toward the kitchen. “I had a head of cabbage chopped up in the sink. Making slaw for dinner.”

His father poked a finger toward him. “And thanks to you, that cabbage is in the trash. Full of busted glass.” Tommy looked downward, and his father said, “So, Mr. DiMaggio, unless you wanna chew your way through that mess, we got nothing else to eat tonight. Can’t make soup out of this damned baseball. And let me tell you one more thing, slugger. Somebody’s gotta fix that window, and right now. We got mosquitoes enough in this damn house.”

“Yes, sir. You want I should go to the neighbor’s, see if somebody can offer us something for dinner?”

His mother shook her head. “Done it already, Thomas. Mrs. King had some collard greens she was taking out of their patch. Mighty nice of her to help us out.”

He waited, as though there might be more, something else he could say. He was used to the despair in both of them, saw it again now. But his father surprised him, tossed him the makeshift baseball.

“Put some more tape on it. It’s coming apart. Maybe you can find some big-­time ball scout to come watch you, sign you to some big deal with the Yankees. I bet they don’t wrap their balls with tape.”



“Hand me the yardstick. And thanks for helping me out.”

Russo held it up to him. “Hey, I threw the ball. I’m a little bit to blame. You get all the busted glass outta there?”

Biggs scanned the edge of the window frame. “Yeah, best as I can tell. Okay, it’s . . . sixteen by . . . twenty. But we gotta tack it on over the whole thing, so let’s cut the board four inches bigger each way.”

“You’re the boss, Tommy.”

He stepped down from the makeshift ladder, an old wooden crate. “I ain’t the boss of much of nothing. I don’t even know what I’m doing here. Tried to get a job over at the hardware store. Nothing there. I could sweep the floor at the damn barber shop. No pay, just a free haircut. My father lets me know every damn day how much work he has to do to feed us. Mostly me. I’m stuck, Ray. No other word for it.”

Russo drew a pencil line on the old piece of clapboard, picked up the rusty hand saw, hesitated. Biggs reached for the saw, said, “You want me to cut it? It oughta be my job anyway.”

Russo handed him the saw, said, “I got something to tell you. Kinda important. I was gonna tell you after the game today. I wanted you to know before any of the others.” He paused. “I joined the navy.”

Biggs waited for the joke, but Russo’s expression didn’t change.

“The United States Navy? You mean like, the ocean and stuff?”

Russo smiled now. “That’s the one. There was a recruiter set up in the city, at the post office. I got on the pay phone to my dad, talked it over. He said to go ahead. He said it made him proud. You know, he was a sailor back in the Great War. Said he fired those big damn guns. He talked about all that when I was a kid. I never give it much thought until I tried finding work, just like you. There’s nothing around here, Tommy. Nothing at all. But now, I’m set to make twenty-­one bucks a month, guaranteed. Think what you could buy with that.”

Biggs stared at his friend, said, “What the hell? You mean all this? You really leaving? When?”

Russo seemed to inflate, pride on his face. “I damn sure do mean it. They say I’ll take the train out of Jacksonville, heading up to some place in Illinois, north of Chicago. I leave in a few weeks.”

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Isadore Olinde Jr.
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Sloppy research
Reviewed in the United States on June 2, 2020
That''s it, my last Shaara book. Terrible and sloppy research. First, he does not understand the US defense establishment. He places the Secretary of the Navy subordinate to the Secretary of War (actually Army). WRONG. From about 1795 until 1947, the Secretary of... See more
That''s it, my last Shaara book. Terrible and sloppy research.

First, he does not understand the US defense establishment. He places the Secretary of the Navy subordinate to the Secretary of War (actually Army). WRONG. From about 1795 until 1947, the Secretary of War and the Secretary of the Navy were equal cabinet level posts, independent of each other. In 1947 the Defense Department was created at cabinet level and the Navy, Army, and Air Force were subordinate to it.

Uboats were not ravaging the US coast in early 1941, that did not happen until early 1942. The Icelandic government was worried about a German landing in 1941, the British had occupied it in May 1940. The USN was not sinking Uboats in 1941. Kimmel was officially commander of the US Fleet, not the Pacific Fleet. His fleet had 9 battleships on December 6, 1941, not 8 (the Colorado was in Bremerton). German invaded the USSR on June 22, 1941 and the world knew about it within hours, not up to 5 days later. The Prince of Wales and Repulse was sunk December 10, 1941, not early 1942.

These are the ones I remembered with keeping a written list. I''ve bought all of his books, but no more. And his writing style keeps getting more tiresome.
60 people found this helpful
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Glenn Garfield Ang
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A few historical errors to take note of
Reviewed in the United States on July 29, 2020
I am a great fan of Jeff Shaara''s historical fiction books and have collected every one of them. I just finished reading this book early this morning and would like to point out just two historical errors which slipped through the editing of this book. The first is the... See more
I am a great fan of Jeff Shaara''s historical fiction books and have collected every one of them. I just finished reading this book early this morning and would like to point out just two historical errors which slipped through the editing of this book. The first is the reference to Port Arthur still under the Soviet Union, which is not possible, because Japan gained the Port Arthur lease from Russia in the 1905 Treaty of Portsmouth that ended the 1904 Russo-Japanese War. The second is the reference to Petain as the leader of "occupied" France. He was the leader of "unoccupied" France, because Germany directly controlled "occupied" France.

Having said that, I have to correct a recent review which claimed that there were nine, not eight, battleships in Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, Hawaii Time. No, there were eight of them: Arizona, Nevada, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, California, Tennessee, Maryland, and West Virginia. The target battleship Utah does not count as an active serving battleship. Another glaring historical error on that reviewer''s part was the claim that Kimmel was commander of the U.S. Fleet. No, Jeff Shaara is again completely correct in claiming that Kimmel was the commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, because it was the Chief of Naval Operations, Stark, who was technically the commander of the entire U.S. Fleet during peace time. After the Pearl Harbor raid, Stark was succeeded as Chief of Naval Operations by Admiral King. Although Kimmel was indeed given the title of Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Fleet, this was technically inaccurate, since there was a separate Atlantic Fleet, which was commanded by Admiral King ever since February 1941. Is the reviewer implying that the U.S. Atlantic Fleet is not part of the U.S. Navy? Perhaps the reviewer thinks that the U.S. Atlantic Fleet was placed under the command of the British First Lord of Admiralty, just as the U.S. Ninth Army would be placed under the command of the British 21st Army Group in 1944? Hence, Jeff Shaara is correct and the reviewer is completely mistaken. Unlike the two earlier points I presented, a lot of criticism raised by this reviewer dwells on interpretations rather than historical errors. Therefore, I would like to caution any readers of that review to take it with tons of salt.

I guess that is all for now. Until I hear from you again, so long!

Cordially yours,

Mr. Glenn Garfield Ang
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Jim Broumley
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very readable, good story
Reviewed in the United States on June 8, 2020
"To Wake the Giant" begins approximately one year before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. In the usual Jeff Shaara formula, he tells the story of the event by following major historical characters who played a role in decision making and examples of "regular... See more
"To Wake the Giant" begins approximately one year before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. In the usual Jeff Shaara formula, he tells the story of the event by following major historical characters who played a role in decision making and examples of "regular people" who were greatly affected by the event. In the case of "Wake the Giant," Shaara provides the perspective of the United States'' chief negotiator with Japan, Secretary of State Cordell Hull, the architect of the attack on Pearl Harbor, Japanese Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, and a new enlistee to the U.S. Navy named Tommy Biggs, who gets assigned to the USS Arizona.
Of course, we hear the voices of other characters who are part of the multitude that made or were affected by this pivotal event in World history. Secretary of State Hull, of course, meets with President Roosevelt and Secretary of War Stimson among others that include Japanese Ambassador Nomura. These meetings let the reader know what the American government knew leading up to the war. Dialog between Yamamoto, his staff and other admirals, show us the planning for the attack. And in Hawaii, we see the preparations for war through the viewpoint of Admiral Husband E. Kimmel and his staff. Finally, Tommy Biggs and his shipmates show us what life was like for a battleship sailor in the weeks before the war and the horrific battle on December 7, 1941.
"To Wake the Giant" is a page-turner. I was never bored or distracted. Like all Shaara novels, the book is well researched and very readable. To me, this author writes the epitome of factual historical fiction, which as I''ve said many times is a great way to learn details of an event. And if you''re not careful, you might even become a fan of history. So put this book on your summer reading list.
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Robert W. Brandstatter
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Shaara formula always works
Reviewed in the United States on May 28, 2020
Yes, he uses the same formula in all his books, chapters interspersed with the little guy on the ground and the big guy decision makers. But it works. No matter how much you think you know about Pearl Harbor, the book still keeps you interested, even knowing the ending. I... See more
Yes, he uses the same formula in all his books, chapters interspersed with the little guy on the ground and the big guy decision makers. But it works. No matter how much you think you know about Pearl Harbor, the book still keeps you interested, even knowing the ending. I tried to read this book slowly and savor each chapter but kept going and reached the end too soon. Ready for the next book, probably dealing with Midway. Only criticism is that there was no mention of regret or afterthoughts by all the people who underestimated or didn’t understand the Japanese and focused on the Germans, including most military chiefs, Roosevelt, and some Cabinet members. Why send three battleships to the Atlantic? There was no war with Germany and what good are battleships against U-boats? Of course, hindsight is 20-20, but the duplicity and ambitions exhibited by Hitler and his militarists should have easily been seen in the Japanese. Why wouldn’t the Japanese emulate Hitler’s blitz of Europe and Russia by attacking in the least expected places, like Hawaii?
10 people found this helpful
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Don H
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Another great book by a talented writer
Reviewed in the United States on June 5, 2020
I am a self professed WWII Pacific enthusiast/expert. I have read detailed books and documents through the years from just summaries of battles all the way through naval records of detailed vessel damage reports and death tolls. This book was hard to put down...... See more
I am a self professed WWII Pacific enthusiast/expert. I have read detailed books and documents through the years from just summaries of battles all the way through naval records of detailed vessel damage reports and death tolls. This book was hard to put down...

I love Jeff Shaara and all of his books from his pick up after Michael Shaara and the Killer Angels with Gods and Generals, the rest of his civil war writing, the revolutionary war, WWII Europe, Korea and now the pacific. He writes "factual fiction" blending a real sense of what his subjects might have felt with actual details so poetically the reader feels their emotions, even feeling like the reader is there. He always writes from opposite sides as well to offer the reader a balanced view of the driving factors of both sides of battle.

My only disappointment with the book is that it drew me in so intensely that I couldn''t put it down and read it too fast. Now I will hunger for quite some time before his next book. Jeff...if you read this, pick up the pace...I''m dying while I wait
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Amazon Customer
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A bit of basic research would improve this a lot.
Reviewed in the United States on May 25, 2020
Pretty good characters and plotting, even though we if course know the end. But, honestly,a bit of research would have made this so much less annoying. The doctors dish out antibiotics at the drop of a hat. How hard would it be to know that antibiotics weren''t a thing... See more
Pretty good characters and plotting, even though we if course know the end. But, honestly,a bit of research would have made this so much less annoying. The doctors dish out antibiotics at the drop of a hat. How hard would it be to know that antibiotics weren''t a thing until the 59a and even penicillin wasn''t common until later in the war.
8 people found this helpful
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Cap'n Dave
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Definitely not Jeff Shaara''s best work.
Reviewed in the United States on November 9, 2020
I usually love Jeff Shaara''s historical novels. They''re usually meticulously researched with a great mix of characters. But this time I couldn''t get over the numerous mistakes about the Navy in this book. I''m a USAF veteran, but had the misfortune to be stationed with... See more
I usually love Jeff Shaara''s historical novels. They''re usually meticulously researched with a great mix of characters. But this time I couldn''t get over the numerous mistakes about the Navy in this book. I''m a USAF veteran, but had the misfortune to be stationed with the Navy in the mid-1990s so I caught a lot of mistakes. First one was having a Navy recruiter wearing whites in December. The Navy of the era had strict uniform codes regarding when to wear whites, and it definitely wasn''t during the winter. Next he states that petty officers really run the ship. No. It''s the Chief Petty Officers, Senior Chiefs and Master Chiefs that really run the ship. The POs were intermediaries between them and the Seamen. Also no enlisted person of any intermediate or high rank would ever put up with being called sir in those days (with the exception of basic training POs and Sergeants). But Shaara repeatedly has Biggs call a PO sir without any rebuke. Lastly the term "Mr" was only used for junior officers. A Seaman Apprentice would never be called that, at least not officially.
3 people found this helpful
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LEE
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
TO WAKE THE GIANT was like reading the movie screenplay for “Tora! Tora! Tora!”
Reviewed in the United States on September 10, 2020
Historical fiction is my favorite genre of literature. I especially enjoy those set during WW2. When I saw TO WAKE THE GIANT: A NOVEL OF PEARL HARBOR in my Amazon Kindle recommendation feed, I immediately purchased it. I then realized that I had previously read THE... See more
Historical fiction is my favorite genre of literature. I especially enjoy those set during WW2. When I saw TO WAKE THE GIANT: A NOVEL OF PEARL HARBOR in my Amazon Kindle recommendation feed, I immediately purchased it. I then realized that I had previously read THE RISING TIDE by Jeff Shaara, a novel which didn’t impress me. Since I had purchased TO WAKE THE GIANT, I decided to read it thinking it might be better than THE RISING TIDE. I was wrong. TO WAKE THE GIANT left me with the same “meh” feeling while reading it.

TO WAKE THE GIANT was like reading the movie screenplay for “Tora! Tora! Tora!”; “In Harm’s Way”; and several other Hollywood “Pearl Harbor” movies, i.e., in other words, if you’ve seen the movie, you get the gist of the novel. TO WAKE THE GIANT simply takes actual people, events, and incidents and rehashes them with fictional dialogue. The novel doesn’t add anything new or significant about the days leading up to Pearl Harbor.

When Jeff Shaara writes about Tommy Biggs (E2) assigned to USS Arizona and other crew members, I found that storyline to be interesting. When he writes about Cordell Hull (US Secretary of State); Isoroku Yamamoto (Japanese Naval Admiral); and other well-known historical figures, my interest waned since he was re-telling well-known stories about them.

If you’re totally unfamiliar with what happened leading up to Pearl Harbor, you might find TO WAKE THE GIANT to be interesting and educational. There are, however, numerous other non-fiction WW2 history books that are much better written, more interesting, more detailed, and more educational. If you are a fan of historical WW2 fiction novels like me, I suggest reading the novels of W.E.B. Griffin, Upton Sinclair, Herman Wouk, James Jones, Norman Mailer, Irwin Shaw, etc.
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Top reviews from other countries

John Mackenzie Nesbitt
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Terrific read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 1, 2020
Another wonderfully researched novel by Mr.Shaara. A must read for anyone with an interest in the history of World War 2. His harrowing evocation of the carnage of the attack on Pearl Harbour and USS Arizona is superb.
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Vince Reimer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great read
Reviewed in Canada on August 25, 2021
Love this author. He brings history to life
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Allan Menzies
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book with prompt delivery, couldn’t be happier
Reviewed in Australia on September 19, 2021
Great book as always by Shaara
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To outlet online sale Wake the Giant: A Novel new arrival of Pearl Harbor online

To outlet online sale Wake the Giant: A Novel new arrival of Pearl Harbor online

To outlet online sale Wake the Giant: A Novel new arrival of Pearl Harbor online

To outlet online sale Wake the Giant: A Novel new arrival of Pearl Harbor online

To outlet online sale Wake the Giant: A Novel new arrival of Pearl Harbor online

To outlet online sale Wake the Giant: A Novel new arrival of Pearl Harbor online

To outlet online sale Wake the Giant: A Novel new arrival of Pearl Harbor online

To outlet online sale Wake the Giant: A Novel new arrival of Pearl Harbor online

To outlet online sale Wake the Giant: A Novel new arrival of Pearl Harbor online

To outlet online sale Wake the Giant: A Novel new arrival of Pearl Harbor online

To outlet online sale Wake the Giant: A Novel new arrival of Pearl Harbor online

To outlet online sale Wake the Giant: A Novel new arrival of Pearl Harbor online

To outlet online sale Wake the Giant: A Novel new arrival of Pearl Harbor online

To outlet online sale Wake the Giant: A Novel new arrival of Pearl Harbor online

To outlet online sale Wake the Giant: A Novel new arrival of Pearl Harbor online

To outlet online sale Wake the Giant: A Novel new arrival of Pearl Harbor online

To outlet online sale Wake the Giant: A Novel new arrival of Pearl Harbor online